Toward Precision
Cancer Surveillance

Cancer Trends Progress Report: 2020 Updates

CTPR image

The National Cancer Institute’s Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences is pleased to announce the newly updated Cancer Trends Progress Report (CTPR), an online summary of trends in US cancer control measures. The annual report summarizes the nation’s progress against cancer in relation to Healthy People 2020 targets. It includes key measures of progress along the cancer control continuum—including prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment, life after cancer, and end of life—and uses national trend data to illustrate where improvements have been made.

From prevention to end of life, the report provides trends across the cancer continuum by sex, age, race, ethnicity, poverty income level, and education level. It displays those trends in relation to Healthy People 2020 targets, when available. New measures this year include Electronic Cigarettes (E-Cigarettes) on the Youth Tobacco Use page and Colorectal Cancer on the Genetic Testing page.

As explained in the 2018 Surgeon General’s Advisory on E-Cigarette Use Among Youth, e-cigarettes are now the most commonly used tobacco product among youth. The rapid increase in use is concerning for many reasons, including adverse cardiopulmonary effects, exposure to harmful chemicals, and risk of addiction and impairments to parts of the developing brain that are involved in learning, memory, and attention.

Understanding trends in youth tobacco use by product type is important because it enables policy makers to target prevention efforts more effectively. The landscape of tobacco products and trends in their use are ever-changing and need regular monitoring. Accordingly, the Cancer Trends Progress Report includes the most recent information on youth use of e-cigarettes and other tobacco products. We will incorporate the latest data available on these measures in each annual update of the report.

The report’s new e-cigarette measure is based on data from the National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS), which is jointly sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The NYTS provides data on e-cigarette and other tobacco product use among youth on an annual basis.

To see more information on youth tobacco use, including e-cigarette use by race/ethnicity, go to the Cancer Trends Progress Reporthttps://progressreport.cancer.gov/prevention/youth_smoking.

Along with pages related to tobacco, the report’s prevention chapter includes topics such as diet, physical activity, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, and ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure. The chapters following prevention are early detection, diagnosis, treatment, life after cancer, and end of life, mirroring the cancer control continuum.